Vicks Flower and Vegetable Garden: Vicks Priced Catalogue of Seeds, Bulbs and Plants for 1876 Unknown author

ISBN: 9781330051887

Published: September 27th 2015

Paperback

196 pages


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Vicks Flower and Vegetable Garden: Vicks Priced Catalogue of Seeds, Bulbs and Plants for 1876  by  Unknown author

Vicks Flower and Vegetable Garden: Vicks Priced Catalogue of Seeds, Bulbs and Plants for 1876 by Unknown author
September 27th 2015 | Paperback | PDF, EPUB, FB2, DjVu, audiobook, mp3, RTF | 196 pages | ISBN: 9781330051887 | 3.32 Mb

Excerpt from Vicks Flower and Vegetable Garden: Vicks Priced Catalogue of Seeds, Bulbs and Plants for 1876Causes of Failure. - In the first place, however, we will examine the causes of failure. If seeds are planted too deep, they either rot in theMoreExcerpt from Vicks Flower and Vegetable Garden: Vicks Priced Catalogue of Seeds, Bulbs and Plants for 1876Causes of Failure.

- In the first place, however, we will examine the causes of failure. If seeds are planted too deep, they either rot in the damp, cold earth, for the want of warmth necessary to their germination, or, after germination, perish before the tender shoots can reach the sun and air- and thus that which was designed for their nourishment proves their grave.If the soil is a stiff clay, it is often too cold at the time the seeds are planted to effect their germination- for it must be understood that warmth and moisture are necessary to the germination of seeds.

Neither of these will do alone. Seeds may be kept in a warm, dry room, in dry sand or earth, and they will not grow. They may be placed in damp earth, and kept in a low temperature, and they will most likely rot, though some seeds will remain dormant a long time under these circumstances. But place them in moist earth, in a warm room, and they will commence growth at once.

Indeed, if seeds become damp in a cold store-room they rot, while if the room is warm they germinate, and thus become ruined, so that seedsmen have to exercise great care in keeping their seeds well aired and dry. This accounts for the sprouting or growing of wheat in the sheaf, when the weather is warm and showery at harvest time, and shows why farmers are so anxious for good harvest weather, so that they may secure their grain perfectly dry.

Another difficulty with a heavy soil is that it becomes hard on the surface, and this prevents the young plants from coming up- or, if, during showery weather, they happen to get above the surface, they become locked in, and make but little advancement, unless the cultivator is careful to keep the crust well broken- and in doing this the young plants are often destroyed.

If stiff, the soil where fine seeds are sown should be made mellow, particularly on the surface, by the addition of sand and light mold.If seeds are sown in rough, lumpy ground, a portion will be buried under the clods, and will never grow- and many that start, not finding a fit soil for their tender roots, will perish. A few may escape these difficulties, and flourish.All of the foregoing cases show good reason for failure, but there is one cause which is not so apparent.

The soil, we will suppose, is well prepared, fine as it can be made, and of that loamy or sandy character best fitted for small seeds. We will suppose, too, that the seeds were sown on the surface, with a little earth sifted over them, and that this was not done until the season was so far advanced as to furnish the warmth necessary to secure vegetation. Under these very favorable circumstances many seeds will grow- and if the weather is both warm and showery, very few will fail. But if, as is very common at the season of the year when we sow our seeds, we have a succession of cold rain storms, many of the more tender kinds will perish.

A nights frost will ruin many more. If, however, the weather should prove warm and without showers, the surface will become very dry, and the seeds, having so slight a covering, will be dried up and perish as soon as they germinate, and before the roots attain sufficient size and strength to go down in search of moisture.

Of course, the finer and more delicate seeds, and those natural to a more favorable climate, suffer more than those that are more robust.Hot-Beds and Cold-Frames. - It is to overcome these evils that hot-beds are useful. By being protected at the sides and ends with boards, and covered with glass, they confine the moisture which arises from the earth, and thus the atmosphere is kept humid and the surface moist, and the plants are not subjected to changes of temperature, as a uniform state can be maintained no matter what the weather may be.

The bottom heat of the hot-bed warms the soil, and enables the grower to



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